Winter Guard headed to area competition this Saturday

At+after+school+practice%2C+junior+Kasey+McGrew+works+on+fundamentals+with+freshman+Tory+Pierce.+The+Winter+Guard++practices+after+school+and+during+their+7th+period+class.

photo or infographic by Eric Gilbert

At after school practice, junior Kasey McGrew works on fundamentals with freshman Tory Pierce. The Winter Guard practices after school and during their 7th period class.

While some students are on the lake or sleeping in, the members of the Winter Guard will spend the end of their spring break in competition. The competition will be held March 14 at Klein Collins High School.

This year was a challenge for the group. 

“It was honestly a rollercoaster,” senior Kailee Tedder said. “I wish I can say it was all good and no bad, but life happens. This last year taught me a lot.”

There had been many struggles with the guard themselves, but at the end of the day, they were a team. Their directors are students from Sam Houston, so time was limited for them when it came to practicing. 

 “Well, we were all closer last season and we had our wonderful director, but sadly this year, we don’t have her,” junior Kasey McGrew said. “We’re all just trying to make it through the rest of this season without her here, and that’s been the hardest part. It was pretty difficult to transition like that but we’re doing our best to make it happen.”

The guard started three years ago. The seniors in guard are the last of the original team that formed this guard.  Their presence and leadership gives the other members courage to continue to grow strong and become leaders in the future. 

“We’ve been preparing for Winter Guard ever since marching season,” junior Alicia Lowe said. “Starting with learning the basics, technique, being strong when performing, showing lots of body, etc. Winter Guard is when the guard is without the band, and it’s indoors. The skill level goes up and you see what guard really is.”

“It was amazing to watch the guard grow as performers and develop new skills,” director Sierra Bell said. “It’s incredibly rewarding to teach them and watch them all accomplish things they didn’t think they could do.”