Athletes still working hard during coronavirus pandemic

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photo or infographic by Willis Football Twitter

Part of Thursday’s football workout from their Twitter. Football coaches are now using the Rack app to get daily workouts to their players.

Self-quarantine and social distancing are not stopping athletes from working hard to dominate the future 6A rivals. Coaches are still committed to helping their athletes with staying in shape during the rest period as well as caring for them and making sure they are doing okay.

Many coaches have found different ways to hold their athletes accountable during social distancing.

“I set up a private Facebook group for the upperclassmen volleyball girls so we could essentially workout together,” volleyball coach Megan Storms said. “I video myself completing the workout and post it, then the girls do the same. I think it has been a great way to hold us all accountable.”

Other forms of social media have also been beneficial during this time.

“We are sending out workouts on twitter Monday through Thursday each week,” wrestling coach Bryan Thomas said.

The relationships between the athletes and coaches is more than just making sure they are staying in shape.

“I have stayed in contact with my kids during this time mainly to make sure they know I am thinking about them as well as missing them,” softball coach Lyndsey Lipscomb said.

Coaches have found many alternatives than being in a gym or weight room.

“I know  most people do not have their own personal gyms, so I encourage them to use any household items they might have such as paint cans for bicep curls or holding a little sibling while doing air squats,” Lipscomb said.

Working out is just as beneficial to the mind as it is the body.

“I also think getting up and moving around is so important for the body and mind during a time when we are all pretty sedentary with the quarantine,” Storms said.

The biggest thing coaches are concerned about is their students at home lives.

“Our  most important thing is family and we are looking at ways to help out our parents,” Thomas says. “Our wrestlers are a big family, and we are all trying to stay in touch.”

It is important to continue the hard work athletes have been doing all year.

“I think this is important during this time for them to keep working out and trying to keep up with the normal routine we have established since August,” Lipscomb said.